Things to Get Rid of in Your Home

Through our lives, we collect things we like.  Some of us get tired of cleaning it or moving it and get rid of it along the way.  Some people don’t move much and don’t feel the need to help their possessions move along during their lives.  And they keep them, and keep keeping them.  So these items become valuable to us and we think about passing them down to our children or grandchildren, but what do the younger generations think about these possessions?  They don’t really care much about them at all…  Oftentimes, we collect things thinking that they may be valuable items that we can pass on to our children or our grandchildren.  Nowadays, it’s very rare to find younger people who have their eyes set on a “valuable” doll, coin, or china collection.  Not to mention finding those rare young adults who may have their heart set on an ornate piece of antique furniture.

So unless you can and are willing to look at the possibility of renting a storage space to keep all of the things that your kids will not want to be passed on to them, you might want to consider purging them from your home.

Doll Collections

I have yet to find that rare kid nowadays who is with Victorian or porcelain dolls.  In this world now filled with Lalaloopsies, My Little Ponies, and Barbies with all the bells and whistles, it’s a gamble to keep on storing your doll collection, hoping that it might someday become an important collection to someone else.  And if you sell it, there are still people out there who will buy them.  Hurry, while they are still out there…  I was at an estate sale with a hundred or more dolls there, and I commented that it looked like the dolls were not moving.  The person holding the sale told me that they had been moving like crazy.  There had been 3 to 4 times that many dolls at the start of the day.  Sell them while you still can.

Silverware and China

Silver, for one, doesn’t really sell for that much anymore.  So unless it’s just really one set of silverware and it’s really something that’s been passed on from generation to generation, it would be best to get rid of them.  Perhaps keep your favorite set.  I mean, it only takes up little room, right?  I am keeping one set that nearly matches my regular set.  I really don’t know when I will use it though.

I guess it goes the same for your china collection.  You can probably keep a favorite set, or something that has some sort of sentimental value.  But in this fast paced times that we’re living in, where fancy entertainment is almost rare, passing on your china collection may just serve as extra stuff stored away collecting dust.  Nowadays, people are more fond of using disposable plates, arranging for a catering service, dining out, or basically anything that will get them out of slaving over a hot stove and doing the dishes after a few glasses of Merlot.  I’ve got china I really liked for my wedding and used it some early on,  then I had no place to store it.  I eventually gave it away to a young couple who I thought would like it and they seemed thrilled to have it.  I found one of the few who do like those beautiful things.  

Antique Furniture

This has the same theme: What do people want nowadays?  Following the trend of minimalist homes, more and more people want furniture that not only take up little room, but more importantly, provide storage and/or function.  While antique furniture still sells to some extent, especially the unusual pieces, it doesn’t sell as much as it did before.  They are also  mostly sought after to be re-purposed into something crafty and shabby chic.

Now how do you go about reducing your clutter and parting with these things?  First, you need to know if you have any use at all for the item.  If it’s just stored away and has been for 10 years, or if you are paying to store it long term, it’s time to get rid of it.  Second, and this was a huge a-ha for me,  is to make wiser purchases and fewer of them.  You could go into a periodic “no buying” season.  Finally, make de-cluttering part of your general cleaning schedule.  It doesn’t have to be just the big things, de-cluttering small items help a lot too.

My daughter is one of those folks who likes pretty and old things.  My journey through my stuff is over for now and I am pleased with the reduced results.  But they may yet revisit me on the way to my daughter’s permanent home – which is a ways off in the future. Enjoy your things while you can.  And move them onto a better home when you are done.   Wherever that home may be – with family or a neighbor who thinks it is cool. 

DeClutter Your Life

I am teaching a class today about useful Apps for Real Estate Agents.  There are a lot of them.  And we like shiny new things, so we add those apps to our nearly full phones because we just know we will use them.  Do you ever go back and remove the stuff from your life that you added just to test it out?   There are many things we add because we think it is good.  And it probably is or would be good if we didn’t already have lots of “good” things in our lives.  We need the few “best” that we will actually use and that will benefit us.

Let’s look at a few areas of our lives that we easily clutter up that steal time, energy, focus or money from us.

  1. Too many apps on your phone or too much unnecessary software on your computer.  These slow down your machines and take your concentration when you have to wade through them to find the ones you really use.  Delete the ones you don’t use.  You can always add them back if you need them again.  
  2. You sign up for that great new software at $25 a month and then you never use it.  Get that out of your checking account.  It is taking $300 a year.  I am sure you can find a better use for $300 a year than software you don’t use.
  3. Committee or time commitments for organizations you really aren’t that committed to.  Or maybe you volunteered for a position you just aren’t good at.  I have learned to stop volunteering for organizations or tasks that don’t fall into a short list of places or groups I am committed to already.  When I have too many feelers out in too many places, my concentration suffers and therefore so does the organization I committed to help.
  4. # 3 principles relate to people asking for your money.  You need to have filters that tell you what you should and should not be giving to.  If not, you just feel overwhelmed with the number of requests.  With GoFundMe and Kickstarter making it simple to ask everyone for money, you have even more opportunities to feel guilty for not giving.  You need filters that define the organizations or types of organizations and people you are going to give money too.  Personally, I give money to Human Trafficking Groups and child sponsorships in organizations where I know the staff.  Those are easy and I can be generous there.  I can throw the rest of the requests away.  Most of them are doing excellent work, but it isn’t my job to fund them all.  Of course I can act on impulse and help someone out, but filters help me make quick decisions about most things.
  5. This last one is tough and we can do a whole post on it.  Relationships.  There are some people that you need to spend more time with and some you need to spend less time with.  You might need to move on from some relationships in order to make room for the new ones.  Don’t let people who drain you control your life.  Either spend less time with them or remove yourself from their lives altogether.  Read the book Boundaries by Henry Cloud if you need more help with this.  

Our lives in this age are very hectic.  Don’t make it more hectic than it needs to be. Remove the clutter in your life and make room to laugh more.  Laughter comes with freedom.